Category Archives: Uncategorized

ISTR Conference Postponed: Rescheduled for 2021

RESCHEDULED DATES: 12 – 15 JULY  2021  

It is with deep regret that we inform you of the postponement of the 14th biennial International Conference of the International Society for Third Sector Research (ISTR).  Due to the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic, we believe the responsible decision is to postpone the Montreal conference this year.  We are pleased that we have been able to reschedule for July 12-15, 2021 in Montreal. All papers, panels, posters, roundtables that have been accepted to ISTR 2020 will be automatically accepted to ISTR 2021.

While a virtual conference during the originally scheduled dates would be an alternative, ISTR’s small staff means that our infrastructure — both technological and logistical — cannot accommodate it in the given time frame.  We will begin to work on a plan to bring some panels and workshops to our members virtually.  Postponement of the conference does not preclude scholarly conversation via other means.  Please allow us some time to explore various options and share information about how to do this in the coming weeks.  This includes students accepted to the PhD Seminar, who will receive a separate communication about their participation. 

We are most grateful for the hard work of our Academic Committee, Montreal Host Committee, and PhD Seminar Co-Chairs.  We want to acknowledge their efforts over the past months to organize an excellent conference. 

As you may be aware, postponing the conference has serious financial implications for the Society.  ISTR counts on its membership dues to support the ongoing operations and initiatives of the association.  As mentioned above, we will be working hard to adapt and provide meaningful opportunities for member engagement this year. If you are not already a member, we hope you will join.  If your membership has expired, we encourage you to renew by visiting www.istr.org/membership

We are offering 3 options for your 2020 Conference registration fees:

1. Refund the full conference registration

2. Apply the registration funds to the 2021 Conference

3. Donate the registration fee to the Society 

Please click HERE for: refund, apply to 2021, or donate

We would like to thank each of you for your patience and understanding as we continue to navigate this historic public health crisis.  We appreciate the notes of support and encouragement we have received to date.  We always like hearing from you and appreciate any additional thoughts or ideas you would like to share. 

On behalf of the officers and members of the board, we hope that you and yours remain safe and healthy in this trying time.

With deep appreciation,

Ruth Phillips
ISTR President

On behalf of ISTR Executive Committee, Conference Committees and Staff

ISTR 2020 – Early Registration Deadline Extended, ISTR 2020 Remains Scheduled

The health and safety of our members is our foremost priority.  Given the general concern about traveling due to the spread of Covid-19, ISTR is extending the early registration deadline to Monday, April 27, 2020.

The ISTR International Conference and ISTR PhD Seminar remains scheduled for July 2020.  Extending the author registration deadline will offer participants more time to consider their plans to travel to Montreal.

The Montreal Tourisme Office is keeping us informed about developments locally and we are monitoring other public health website.  Montreal is currently a low-risk destination for community spread of Covid-19.

If you decide not to attend we will refund your conference registration in full.  Due to the extraordinary circumstances, we will not charge the usual administrative fee on refunds.

We will keep monitoring the global situation and will provide updates.

We look forward to seeing you in Montreal. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Margery Daniels, at mdaniels@istr.org.

Please stay in touch!

With best regards,

Ruth Phillips
ISTR President

What to do around the Guy-Concordia metro station…

ISTR 2020 will take place at Concordia University, which is easily accessible by the nearest metro station: Guy-Concordia – right next to the university.  It is located in one of the busiest areas of Montreal’s downtown and there is plenty to see and do right in this area of the city. Its multipurpose and multiethnic character is illustrated by a staggering number of restaurants, pubs, stores, apartment buildings, and small businesses.

History

Guy-Concordia metro station was inaugurated in 1966 as part of the first metro line that was built to make the provision of public transport in Montreal more diverse and practical leading up to the 1967 International Exhibition. The Expo would transform Montrealers’s view of the world at a time when the province was coming out of the “Grande Noirceur” (The Great Darkness of conservative politics in Quebec) and diving right into the “Revolution tranquille” period of intense socio-political change in the province.

Around the station

Coming out of the station, you will have no problem finding a place to eat no matter which direction you might take. The area remains alive at all times!

Ecole restaurant

With some luck, you might be able to get a table at the École des métiers de la restauration et du tourisme de Montréal (EMRTM, 1822 boulevard de Maisonneuve Ouest, 514 350-8049). There you will get an excellent meal for a more than reasonable price. You will contribute at the same time to the professional training of students in cooking, tourism, and wine counseling. L’École des métiers de la restauration et du tourisme de Montréal is located in a magnificent Victorian building built in 1887 by the Montreal architect Alexander Francis Dunlop. The renovation work of the building was executed with the highest respect of the environment in mind, and the building has recently received a LEED-Silver certification.

Glow in the dark mini golfYou might find the Putting-Edge Glow in the Dark Mini-golf to be a fun experience. Yes, this is an inside minigolf experience in a dark but amusing environment! An unusual and relaxing group activity in a place where the outside weather does not matter (1259 Guy street, 514-507-8106). A particularly fun activity if your children are with you during the Conference.

For those who appreciate fine arts, the MBA museum, just a few minutes from the metro, is a MUST!  Founded in 1860, the MBA is the museum par excellence. Since 2013, a patrimonial church adjacent to the museum is now part of the museum. The Salle Burgie, as it is now known, has been transformed into a 444 seat auditorium for concerts and conferences (1339 Sherbrooke street west).

Domain de messieursInterested to see what is left of the New France period in the Montreal downtown area? You can visit the Domaine des Messieurs de Saint-Sulpice (2065 Sherbrooke west). The vast and green domain harbors the Tower, the College de Montreal, a private French secondary school for boys and  girls, its buildings and chapel, the Grand Seminaire de Montréal also with its buildings and chapel, and the last remnants of the old fort of the Mission de la Montagne (1675). It is located at the foot of the fort that gave its name to the street du Fort, where Marguerite Bourgeoys founded a school for young American girls. During the summer, the Grand Seminaire organizes visits which again provides an opportunity to learn about the rich history of Montreal.

masonic templeThe Montreal Masonic Memorial Temple is a historic masonic temple located on the corner of Sherbrooke Street and St. Marc Street (1850 Sherbrooke Street West, Montréal, 514 -933-6432). Opened in 1930, the work of the architect John Smith Archibal was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 2001, as an example of one of Canada’s most elegant buildings in the Beaux-Arts style. The Masonic Memorial Temple, as its name suggests, was conceived as both a meeting place for the Masonic order as well as a memorial to the Freemasons who served and gave their lives during the Great War of 1914-18. An interesting fact about the Temple: the first true Masonic temple was established in 1825, in Old Montreal, where the Marché Bonsecours stands today.

Where to eat

  • Qing Hua Dumplings (Chinese): 1676 Lincoln avenue
  • Kazu restaurant (Japanese): 1862 Ste. Catherine west.
  • Café Myriade owned by the barista Anthony Benda: 1432 Mackay street
  • Crudessence (fresh, vegetarian, vegan, and uncooked cuisine): 2157 Mackay street
  • Koa Lua (Poke): 1446 Ste. Catherine street west.

 

Thank you to Lorraine Bergeron, MA student, Concordia University for writing this post.

The impact from within – voicing our emotions in research

ISTR’s professional development workshops are designed by our own members, and respond to perceived needs within our own community.  This year we have a number of special sessions and workshops planned for the conference – you can read all about them on our website.

This year, one ISTR member is organizing a special kind of professional development workshop entitled “The impact from within – voicing our emotions in research.”  The intention of this workshop is not to propose a theoretical discussion, but rather to create a space where PhD students, scholars at different career stages, and practitioners may voice some of the personal issues they have experienced while doing research, such as experiencing feelings of rejection, failure, judgement, isolation, procrastination and pressure to excel.  Through a fishbowl format of interaction, we will start off the conversation and invite participants to join the conversation at any time.  And then together the group will discuss and share different strategies for coping with these stresses.

fishbowl

The workshop is being organized by Fabio Prado Saldanha, a PhD student at HEC Montréal.  He writes, “As a PhD candidate doing research with vulnerable young people living in the deprived outskirts of a huge metropolis, I was confronted  with realities that had never before been tangible for me. Doing research in places where barricades were built to prevent police from getting into the territory, and where drugs and weapons were deliberately displayed made me reflect beyond my role as a researcher while staring at structural social inequalities that I hardly feel able to change. After collecting my data in such environments, I came back to my hometown in Canada, and started to transcribe my interviews. The shock I felt was even stronger then. As I sat in front of my computer in a well-equipped house, I started to feel different emotions than I had when I was in the field.  Feelings like injustice and impotency really hit hard on me, culminating in even further negative moods that arouse throughout different periods of the day, until the moment that I searched for medical help and I was diagnosed with depression.”

The aim of this workshop is to create a safe, respectful, and welcoming space where participants may feel comfortable voicing the emotions they have experienced in research. Discussants are not previously determined: the audience itself will co-create the discussion. Although themes will be emergent-oriented, some topics will be proposed – such as family-work balance, insecurities about choices made, etc. –, with the intention to share strategies that we have developed to cope with our vulnerable situations in research.

As a community of researchers, if we intend to create impact in society with our research, it is also useful to take a look at these impacts from within.

If you plan to attend this workshop and would be willing to help get the conversation started, please email Secretariat@istr.org and let us know.

 

 

Celebrating the Award Winners at the ISTR Conference

Several awards were presented at ISTR’s 13th International Conference at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam back in July and we would like to take this opportunity to tell you about the award winners.

Emerging Scholar Dissertation Award

This award, established in 2006 by an anonymous donor, is given once every two years at the biennial ISTR conference to the author of the best dissertation in the field of comparative study of civil society organizations, nonprofit organizations, philanthropy, and voluntarism and related issues.  The purpose of the award is to encourage young scholars to enter the field of nonprofit and philanthropic studies throughout the world.  The winner this year was chosen from among 60 other entries from 28 countries. The overall quality of the entries, the diversity of the topics approached, the scope of areas addressed, as well as the spectrum of research methods utilized, left a very positive impression with the members of this year’s Selection Committee.

This year’s winner is Andrew Heiss, Brigham Young University, for his PhD thesis Amicable Contempt: The Strategic Balance between Dictators and International NGOs.

andrew-heiss-2016Examining the activities and adaption of international nongovernmental organisations (INGOs) in the context of increasing global restrictions on civic space, Andrew’s dissertation addresses the paradox that while INGOs’ service and advocacy activities can threaten the legitimacy and power of authoritarian regimes, numerous autocratic states still allow the work of INGOs; similarly, despite limitations and restrictions on their own activities, numerous INGOs continue to operate in these countries. Thus, the idea put forward and explored throughout the dissertation is that the relationship between INGOs and autocratic regimes is a state of amicable contempt: each party is aware that the other both threatens and supports their existence.

Focusing on the timeframe of 1991 to 2014, and on the three cases of Egypt, Russia and China, the dissertation addresses questions about: Why do regimes allow INGOs to work in their country? What influences INGO decision making in restrictive environments? How do regimes reap the benefits of INGOs programming? How do INGOs adapt to restrictions? A creative, detailed and thorough examination of an increasingly important international issue, the dissertation thereby provides a strong theoretical basis for examining INGO-dictator relationships. Additionally, it offers a diversity of practical findings that can be used by local and international NGOs to manage risk and to improve their likelihood of survival and impact of their work.

The Selection Committee also acknowledges the merit and achievements of the two other finalists.

Nora Derbal, Freie Universität Berlin, Charity for the Poor in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, 1961–2015.

Sara Compion, University of Kentucky, Volunteering And Democratization In Southern Africa: A Structural And Cultural Analysis.

Best Articles in Voluntas 2016 & 2017

 These articles will be open access and available to the public for August and September.  Patricia Mendonca, University of Sao Paulo and chair of the awards committee, presented awards to:

  • Abdulrazak Karriem, University of Western Cape Town, South Africa and Lehn M. Benjamin, Indiana University, United States, for their article, “How Civil Society Organizations Foster Insurgent Citizenship: Lessons from the Brazilian Landless Movement,” February 2016, Volume 27, Issue I, pp 19-36.
  • Jasmin Slootjes, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Thomas Kampen, University for Humanistic Studies, The Netherlands for their article, “Is My Volunteer Job Not Real Work? The Experiences of Migrant Women with Finding Employment Through Volunteer Work,” October 2017, Volume 28, Isuue 5, pp 1900–1921.

Best Poster

Stefan Toepler, George Mason University, and Publications Committee Chair presented the award to Andre-Anne Parent; Stéphanie Tourillon-Gingras; and Christian Jetté, Université de Montréal for their poster The Entre-Maisons Ahuntsic – A Collaborative Project at the Hearth of Low-rent Housing Units. Click here to see the award-winning poster!

best poster “It is the task of the publications committee to select and confer the best poster presentation award.  Doing so is a very delightful task; our only regret is that we cannot offer any publications opportunities along with the award.  That said, in selecting our awardee, we look for both intellectual and visual appeal of the poster. Intellectually, we look for clearly presented statements of the research question and approach that also convince through concision. Visually, we like posters that utilize different design elements without being distracting and that easily guide the eye along … bonus points go to posters that manage to do so without overtaxing the eyes of the grey-haired crowd and do not force us to open the magnification app on our iPhones.  There were many highly fascinating posters, but this one had the best overall package.”

PhD 3 Minute Thesis

3 minute thesisRuth Phillips, University of Sydney in Australia and President-Elect of ISTR, presented the award for the PhD 3 Minute Thesis to Fanny Dethier for her presentation titled Seeing Through NPOs. A new innovation for ISTR, this experimental competition offered a light-hearted way for students in the ISTR PhD Seminar to practice the art of distilling their ideas down to the core questions and concerns in 3 minutes and 1 PowerPoint slide.  Ten students all gave very good presentations during the seminar and the experience was fun for the audience.  A prize was awarded to the person who made the case for their research in the most clear and compelling manner, and the winner made her presentation to the entire plenary. You can view a video of her presentation (at the end of the opening plenary) by clicking here.

But besides the fun, the 3-minute thesis teaches important lessons – research should be designed to be useful, and in order to be useful (and in order to funded!) the users need to understand it and believe in it.  Sometimes 3-minutes are all we have to get the attention of our audience.

It is ISTR’s hope that this competition provided an opportunity to make the wider conference attendees more aware of the PhD seminar, and hopefully inspired the students to feel more connected to the larger group of scholars and begin to see it as their research home into the future.

Congratulations to all the award winners!

Three highlights of the ISTR PhD Seminar 2018: Or why participation is highly recommended

Guest post by Franz Koranyi who is writing a PhD on ‘philanthropic engagement in community-based networks in the field of education’ at the Freie Universität Berlin, Germany.

Do you know that feeling of anticipation preceding an important presentation or event? You anticipate your own excitement, helpful feedback of others, interesting encounters and wonder how you will experience the ambiance of the event. Preparing for the fourth ISTR PhD Seminar from 8th to 10th July on the train to Amsterdam, the Netherlands, I had this exact feeling. Like Mieke Berghmans I expected to have the (rare) opportunity to talk, discuss, and work with other early career researchers who are all interested in the same field, concerned with phenomena such as the third sector, philanthropy and social entrepreneurship. This promised the chance to discuss my PhD in a different way than I present it to my peers in educational science.

From the moment I arrived at the hotel, the feeling of excitement became a feeling of joy. We had all been booked in the same hotel which meant that we met right before the start of the seminar. Having been given the opportunity to share a room, I first met my roommate from Jamaica. This was a perfect match since he not only is a very empathetic person and great roommate, but also works on the engagement of foundations. So, we were on the same page from the very beginning. Arriving at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, we experienced a very welcoming atmosphere that instantly made us feel comfortable. After hearty welcoming words by the organizers Pelle Åberg (Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College) and René Bekkers (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam), and an interesting keynote speech by Taco Brandsen (Radboud University), we were ready to go for very valuable two seminar days. In the following I am going to sketch three aspects that in my opinion significantly shaped that experience:

Group sessions: a key element of the PhD Seminar were the group sessions of about six mini-plenaryor seven students and two faculty members. Every student had 45 minutes that were approximately divided into 15 minutes of presentation and 30 minutes of discussion. As stated by Mieke Berghmans this turned ‘normal’ presentations at conferences upside down, thereby providing more space for discussion of ideas, concepts, and most importantly challenges that you face at the moment. What I found to be most special in comparison to other workshops was that presentations went completely without slides. Instead, prepared with the abstracts of each participant, we sat together speaking to and discussing with each other. This implied for the presenter to come straight to the point; otherwise you risked that your audience would lose your line of thought. Still, in cases of confusion participants could easily make additional clarifications. The group sessions had a very positive atmosphere as described for the years before by Christiane Rudmann, and we received valuable feedback by students and faculty members alike.

PhD1Community: another important element of the PhD Seminar was the interaction outside of group sessions. There were tons of opportunities to enter into conversations with each another: We mingled in breaks (with delicious catering), enjoyed a lovely BBQ together, drank a glass of wine at the reception, or danced at the PhD party (to the music played by René Bekkers and band). This allowed us to meet fascinating people from all over the world in a more informal setting (more than 50 students from over 20 countries). At the same time, the range of interests was overwhelming, ranging from measuring the third sector in Malaysia for the first time, seeking civil society and the public sphere in social media, to research on volunteering by vulnerable groups. All the interaction gave us the opportunity to connect with each other and exchange not only knowledge, ideas, and daily challenges in the PhD life, but also talk about matters apart from our academic identity.

Professional development: the PhD seminar as well as additional workshops during the conference provided the opportunity for us to also think about our future careers. During the seminar we were offered three workshops on scholarly identity, the tenure track, and getting published that were chaired by a faculty member. These were open formats, in which information on the subject was mixed with personal experiences and stimulated by additional participant inputs as well as questions. For example, scholars in third sector research often face the challenge that they need to specialize in another discipline since (at least in Europe) schools in nonprofit / third sector studies are rare. Thus, we discussed what strategies are suited to cope with this challenge. Furthermore, during the subsequent ISTR conference, there were more workshops on professional development such as ‘post-doc opportunities’, ‘teaching and learning’, ‘non-academic job market’, ‘navigating job-market and career strategies’ and ‘academic job interviews’. These workshops provided food for thought and offered opportunities for further exchange on our future plans.

These are only three aspects of the PhD Seminar, however, there was even more to experience (e.g., a 3 Minute Thesis Competition as described by Steph Haywood) that would not fit into the space of this post. Thus, I highly recommend applying for the next ISTR PhD Seminar in 2020 – because of both the excited feeling before meeting your fellow PhD colleagues and the joyful, interesting, and valuable experience during the seminar sessions, social exchanges, professional development workshops and many more. A big thank you to the team at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the ISTR, the faculty members and all the fellow PhD students for making this experience possible. I am looking forward to seeing you at another seminar or conference.

 

 

Ten things you didn’t know about private philanthropy for development

The following is an overview of a special roundtable ISTR is hosting at this year’s conference. 

Philanthropy’s role in advancing sustainable development attracts a lot of attention. However, very few figures are available to date on the volumes and sectors of philanthropic flows supporting development. To address this lack of reliable and comparable data, the OECD produced the report on Private Philanthropy for Development. The report calls into question long-held assumptions about the volume, nature and potential of foundations’ engagement in developing countries, and the role they can play to support the SDGs.

philanthropy for development

The report examines philanthropic resource flows for development purposes, as well as foundations’ priorities, practices and partnering behaviors. It presents fresh perspectives and action-oriented recommendations to optimize philanthropy’s role in support of sustainable development.

This report offers practical insights for government policy makers and decision makers in civil society organisations, social enterprises and foundations. It results from close co-operation between the OECD Development Centre’s Network of Foundations Working for Development (netFWD) and the OECD Development Co-operation Directorate.

The ISTR Conference will host a round table introducing and presenting the 2018 OECD Report on Private Philanthropy for Development. Lorenzo Pavone, Head (Acting), Partnerships and Network Unit, OECD Development Centre, will present the report’s ground-breaking data and fresh perspectives on how to optimise philanthropy’s role in support of sustainable development.

Following this, the panel will discuss the report’s findings and its implications.  Panel participants include:

 

Ten things you didn’t know about private philanthropy for development

12 July, 10:30am to 12:00pm

ISTR Conference, VU University Amsterdam, Room, 2A-33