Category Archives: Program

Ten things you didn’t know about private philanthropy for development

The following is an overview of a special roundtable ISTR is hosting at this year’s conference. 

Philanthropy’s role in advancing sustainable development attracts a lot of attention. However, very few figures are available to date on the volumes and sectors of philanthropic flows supporting development. To address this lack of reliable and comparable data, the OECD produced the report on Private Philanthropy for Development. The report calls into question long-held assumptions about the volume, nature and potential of foundations’ engagement in developing countries, and the role they can play to support the SDGs.

philanthropy for development

The report examines philanthropic resource flows for development purposes, as well as foundations’ priorities, practices and partnering behaviors. It presents fresh perspectives and action-oriented recommendations to optimize philanthropy’s role in support of sustainable development.

This report offers practical insights for government policy makers and decision makers in civil society organisations, social enterprises and foundations. It results from close co-operation between the OECD Development Centre’s Network of Foundations Working for Development (netFWD) and the OECD Development Co-operation Directorate.

The ISTR Conference will host a round table introducing and presenting the 2018 OECD Report on Private Philanthropy for Development. Lorenzo Pavone, Head (Acting), Partnerships and Network Unit, OECD Development Centre, will present the report’s ground-breaking data and fresh perspectives on how to optimise philanthropy’s role in support of sustainable development.

Following this, the panel will discuss the report’s findings and its implications.  Panel participants include:

 

Ten things you didn’t know about private philanthropy for development

12 July, 10:30am to 12:00pm

ISTR Conference, VU University Amsterdam, Room, 2A-33

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How to Run a Conference Panel That Isn’t Horrible

Several ISTR members and friends of ISTR have sent us copies of this blog by Adam Grant.  We thought it resonated and wanted to share it with all of you.  The text of his blog is below.

How to Run a Conference Panel That Isn’t Horrible

Published on 

Whenever I go to a conference, the thing I dread most is panels.A typical panel is a show about nothing. Sure, it worked on Seinfeld—but they had comedic geniuses obsessing over the perfect script and a whole cast of skilled actors and producers making it sing. (Though panels do have some recurring characters: I’m sure you’ve met The Rambler, The Spotlight Hog, and The Mansplainer.)

Panels aren’t going away any time soon. Since I end up sitting on them and moderating them on a regular basis, I decided to see if I could fix them.

And by fix them, I mean run a panel that doesn’t ruin your day. Here are my guidelines:

CHOOSING THE CAST

1. Keep it small. In my experience, the best panels have a moderator and no more than two or three guests. Just like in teams, less is more. Larger panels create more communication and coordination difficulties. It’s impossible to find a rhythm with six people on stage. People just sit there waiting to make their point.

2. Invite people who complement each other. I’ve suffered through panels that flop because the participants have nothing in common and because they have totally redundant perspectives. You need a mix of similarities and differences. In psychology it’s called optimal distinctiveness. Every panelist should fit into a common topic but stand out based on having unique insights or experiences.

3. Design for relationships between the panelists. A group of strangers sitting on stage together is a recipe for disaster. A great panel feels like being a fly on the wall for an actual conversation between friends or sparring partners.

Don’t just think about the qualities that you want in individual panelists or moderators; invite people who actually know each other. They’re used to having conversations together, they’re familiar with each other’s views, and they’re more likely to be comfortable debating and disagreeing respectfully.

If they haven’t connected before, have them spend some time getting to know each other. Even a quick email exchange followed by five minutes face-to-face backstage can help build rapport and give time to compare notes on what to cover (and avoid).

SETTING THE STAGE

4. Encourage the panelists to talk to each other. A rookie mistake is when panelists are all having individual conversations with the moderator. That’s just a bunch of one-on-one interviews slapped together—you would never do that in a meeting or at a party.

Maryellen Reilly introduced me to a creative way of nudging authentic discussion: invite each participant to ask a question of one other panelist. Along with catapulting them into a natural back-and-forth, it’s fascinating to see what they most want to learn from one another.

5. Ask them to keep their comments short. The most compelling responses are usually no more than 60 seconds. That’s where you start pushing the limits of conversational attention span and violating the natural flow of back-and-forth. Go longer and you’re just doing sequential monologues. Short answers open the door for burstiness, where it sounds like the panel is literally bursting with ideas. The energy picks up, people veer off script and actually build on one another, and there’s more room for unexpected wisdom and spontaneous humor.

6. Don’t let every panelist answer every question. That immediately devolves into mind-numbing turn-taking. No one has something interesting or informative to say on all the topics.

7. Tell them you might interrupt them. The moderator’s job is to guide the conversation to make it worthwhile for the audience. So if panelists start rambling, you need to jump in with a comment, a fresh question, or a redirect. At first I struggled to do that—I was afraid of being disagreeable. But I found that when I told panelists in advance that I might interrupt them, the awkwardness melted away. It’s not rude to interrupt them once you have their permission.

PREPARING THE SCRIPT

8. Start by asking for a story. Panels fall flat when participants never get to share their knowledge—and the audience has no context for why they’re there. Sometimes moderators try to solve that by reading lengthy bios for each panelist, which is a huge waste of time. Just introduce them with a few highlights that explain why they’re on stage, and invite them each to tell a story on the topic.

As you can hear in a #MeToo panel that I moderated at WorkHuman this spring with Ashley Judd, Ronan Farrow, and Tarana Burke, people come alive when they tell stories. I know that as a panelist, I’m much more entertaining when I tell a story about learning to love criticism or being told I type too loud. And then there are some natural follow-up questions to ask.

9. Pose questions that make the audience—and the panelists—think. The richest questions often start with why (to get at motivation/purpose) and how (to get at strategy/tactics). It can also help to surface tension, which doesn’t have to be with other panelists; you can prompt them to challenge conventional wisdom or their own past experiences.

Two of my favorite questions are “What’s the worst career advice you’ve gotten?” and “What’s something you believed early in your career that you now think is wrong?” Sometimes it helps to give them the questions in advance, both for peace of mind and for reflection time.

Another trick is to have the audience ask their questions at the beginning of the panel instead of the end. As Kumar Garg points out, it helps the panelists get more specific and more practical.

10. Run a lightning round. Come ready with a few questions that panelists can answer in a word or a sentence. Other than an opening story, that’s the only time you want everyone to chime in: it’s a great way to get diverse ideas on the table swiftly and represent everyone’s voice. It can be a fun appetizer early on if there’s a burning question where you want to surface a range of views, a nice interjection to keep the conversation moving if it’s dragging in the middle, or a strong closing if you want to wrap up with a light, memorable Q&A.

It’s always reassuring to hear successful people open up about their vices. What was your worst idea ever? What task do you procrastinate on? When do you feel the most self-doubt?

***

Adam Grant is an organizational psychologist at Wharton, a #1 New York Timesbestselling author, and the host of the TED podcast WorkLife. He shares insights in his free monthly newsletter, GRANTED.

Special Sessions at the ISTR Conference

Several professional development workshops and exciting special sessions are planned for the upcoming ISTR Conference in Amsterdam this year.  We want to make sure to draw your attention to these events as some of them request advance registration.

Story Collider Storytelling Workshop

Tuesday July 10, 2018 9am-12pm

50 spots available by registration only.  Sign up by completing this short registration form.

The best available science tells us that for most audiences, stories are more interesting, understandable, convincing, and memorable than evidence‐focused communications. However, scientists are unfamiliar with this literature and often resist or distrust storytelling approaches. This storytelling workshop explores how to develop and tell personal stories about science with intellectual honesty and ethical consideration. Lecture and discussion will share research on storytelling and narrative persuasion and highlight the value of personal stories in science. Participants will learn how to find, develop, and perform their own deeply human stories of science.   This workshop will be facilitated by Story Collider.

Getting Published

Wednesday July 11, 2018 5:00-6:30pm

Taco Brandsen & Ruth Simsa, Editors, Voluntas

Susan Phillips, Editor, NVSQ

Rob Macmillan, Editor, Voluntary Sector Review

Hakan Seckinelgin, Editor, Journal of Civil Society

Filip Wijkstorm, Editor, Nonprofit Policy Forum

Moderator: Jeffrey Brudney, Former Editor NVSQ

Post-doc opportunities

Tuesday July 10, 10:30-11:30am

Please complete this short form to register to attend this event.

In this session, panelists will discuss how to secure a (funded) post doc, what to expect from a post doc, and how to best use the years spent in a post doc position and plan ahead for the next stages of your career.

Teaching AND Learning:  Perspectives on Engaged Scholarship in the Third Sector

Wednesday July 11, 9:00 to 10:30 am

This instructional, demonstrative and interactive workshop will present best practices and lessons learned about teaching in a nonprofit graduate program where a comprehensive model of engaged scholarship has been refined over the last 14 years.  Faculty and current students will present how they have used cases and applied consulting projects to teach and study nonprofit management topics. Impact data and examples of finished projects will be presented.  Systems for managing student team dynamics, fairly assessing group projects, and strategies for ensuring a good experience for “client” organizations will be shared as well as a detailed applied project guidebook that was written by and for students.

Laura Deitrick, University of San Diego, USA

Hans Peter Schmitz, University of San Diego, USA

Lyn Corbett, MA, University of San Diego, USA

Ashley Nadar, University of San Diego, USA

Bethany Gilbert, University of San Diego, USA

The Non-Academic Job Market

Thursday July 12, 2:00 to 3:30pm

A range of non-academic career paths are available for researchers in the Third Sector.  Speakers in this session will discuss how they found their current position, what the position requires, and how a PhD could/should present themselves as a possible candidate for similar positions.

Rachel Wimpee, Rockefeller Archive Center, USA

Inés M. Pousadela, CIVICUS/ Institute of Communication and Development, Uruguay

Navigating Job-market and Career Strategies

Thursday July 12, 2:00 to 3:30 pm

This discussion will identify pathways to different career opportunities for those in the early stages of their career development and those considering a transition mid-career.  What types of career opportunities are available for those in the Third Sector?  What types of jobs might be a good fit for ISTR members seeking work?  What are the main factors that should be considered in choosing a career path?

Angela Bies, University of Maryland, USA

Debbie Haski-Leventhal, Macquarie University, Australia

Marlei Pozzebon, HEC Montréal & FGV-EAESP Brazil

Academic job interviews

Friday July 13, 12:30 – 2:00pm

This session will offer perspectives on the academic job interview process from those who have participated in search committees in Europe, the United States, South America, and Australia.  Participants will hear insights on what is expected during academic job interviews and what faculty are looking for from candidates.

Marc Jegers, Vrije Universiteit Brussels, Belgium

Elizabeth Dale, Seattle University, USA

Gabriel Berger, Universidad San Andres, Argentina

Ruth Phillips, University of Sydney, Australia

 

Announcing ISTR’s Closing Plenary Keynotes

Natalie Fenton and Shih-Jung Hsu are ISTR’s keynote speakers for the closing session of the conference on Friday July 13, 2018, entitled Transforming Democratic Contexts: Challenges for the Third Sector.

This session will focus on how civil society responds to disruptions to democracy and climate change.

Natalie Fenton Natalie-Fentonis Professor of Media and Communications, Goldsmiths, University of London where she is the co-director of Goldsmiths Leverhulme Media Research Centre and the Centre for the Study of Global Media and Democracy. She is also the research lead for Civil Society Futures (CSF) – an independent inquiry into civil society in England in partnership with Forum for the Future, CitizensUK and openDemocracy. Natalie’s own research addresses issues relating to civil society, voluntary sector, political resistance, democracy and the media. She is active in civil society herself as Chair of the Media Reform Coalition and (until recently) as Vice-chair of the Board of Directors for the campaign group Hacked Off – both of which campaign for a free, plural and accountable media. Her latest book is Digital, Political, Radical (Polity 2016).

At the conference, Dr. Fenton will discuss the interim findings from Civil Society Futures: An Inquiry into Civil Society in England – an effort to consider how civil society can best prepare for the futures that may lie ahead.  She will discuss emergent social, political and economic strategies developed from new ways of thinking about how economic and social lives connect through attempts to put more power in the hands of more people.

 

Shih-Jung_HSUShih-Jung Hsu is currently Professor of the Department of Land Economics at the National Chengchi University (NCCU), Taiwan, and is the Director of the Center for the Third Sector.  Dr. Hsu’s research concentrates on local environmental movements, urban and rural planning, land use policy, and sustainable development in Taiwan. He was former president of the Taiwan Association of Third Sector Research (TATSR). He is also a leading activist in Taiwan, and he has established one important NGO — the Taiwan Rural Front (TRF) to help farmers and local residents against land grabbing and forced eviction from the state, and he served as founding president of the TRF. His recent book, Land Justice, has received the National Tripod Award 2017 from the Chinese Ministry of Culture.

Golden Tripod Award

Dr. Hsu received his Ph.D. degree from the College of Urban Affairs and Public Policy, University of Delaware, USA (1995). He also possesses two Masters degrees, one in Political Science from the University of Delaware (1990); the other one in Land Economics from the NCCU (1986).

At the conference, Dr. Hsu will discuss his current research efforts: (1) Land governance and Taiwan’s sustainable development, (2) land use policy and its historical context, (3) environmental and human right NGOs in Taiwan.

 

Notice to Conference Authors: Important new information about paper submissions

In an effort to streamline our processes, ISTR has changed the way papers should be submitted and distributed for the upcoming conference.  ISTR will no longer be sending emails connecting speakers and moderators directly.  Authors take note, this year, authors will be asked to upload their papers to our online AllAcademic system (https://www.istr.org/page/aapby June 10.  This will allow your moderator and conference participants to read your paper in advance of the conference.  Authors will be assigned a moderator in late April/early May and they will be given instructions for downloading your paper from AllAcademic.

The papers will be hosted on the password protected All Academic site, and will thus not be available to the general public.  We recommend that authors include the phrase “Draft – not for distribution” at the top of their paper pending further revisions you may wish to make following feedback from your conference peers.

For the first time this year, ISTR has also published paper drafting guidance.

Please note that ISTR has published guidance for paper presentations and poster design and presentation, including information on how to print your poster at a local print shop.

Post-Conference Publication and Working Paper Opportunities

Following the conference, authors are invited to revise their papers in the light of conference feedback with an eye to an appropriate submission to Voluntas, the peer‐ reviewed official journal of ISTR, or any other journals in the field.  Publication decisions are the sole discretion of such journals and ISTR does not participate in the editorial decisions on such submissions.  Authors can also submit their papers to be reviewed for selection for publication in the ISTR Conference Working Papers Series to be published after the conference on the ISTR website.

Questions? 

Please direct any additional questions to ISTR at ISTR_Secretariat@jhu.edu

ISTR Author Registration Deadline – March 16

If you plan to present a paper, panel, poster, or roundtable at the ISTR Conference in Amsterdam then you MUST register for the conference by March 16.  Only those who register by March 16 will have their presentations scheduled and their names and abstracts printed in the ISTR Conference program.  Those that register after March 16 will not be scheduled to present.

And as a reminder, in order to register for the conference you need to be a paying member of ISTR (not a non-paying affiliate).

We look forward to seeing you in Amsterdam!

 

Special Events at the ISTR Conference: Book signing, professional development seminars, and canal tours!

Amidst the flurry of taking care of your conference registration, booking your flight and hotel, and of course writing your conference paper, you may not have noticed the page we have on the ISTR website announcing several special events at this year’s conference in Amsterdam.  Be sure to take a look as some require advance registration to attend.

Free Canal Tours for Conference Participants!

We are pleased to announce that the External Affairs Office of the City of Amsterdam is offering free canal tour tickets for all ISTR Conference attendees.  Tickets can be picked up at the registration desk and will be valid July 10-July 14. 

Story Collider Storytelling Workshop

Tuesday July 10, 2018, 9am-12pm, 50 spots available by registration only.  Sign up by completing this short registration form.

The best available science tells us that for most audiences, stories are more interesting, understandable, convincing, and memorable than evidence‐focused communications. However, scientists are unfamiliar with this literature and often resist or distrust storytelling approaches. This storytelling workshop explores how to develop and tell personal stories about science with intellectual honesty and ethical consideration. Lecture and discussion will share research on storytelling and narrative persuasion and highlight the value of personal stories in science. Participants will learn how to find, develop, and perform their own deeply human stories of science.   This workshop will be facilitated by Story Collider.

Professional Development Seminars: Supporting ISTR’s Emerging Scholars

Designed to support recent PhD graduates and those in the early stages of their careers, but of course open to all, ISTR is pleased to offer 5 professional development seminars at the conference:

  • Academic job interviews
  • The Non-Academic Job Market
  • Navigating Job-market and Career Strategies
  • Post-doc opportunities
  • Teaching AND Learning: Perspectives on Engaged Scholarship in the Third Sector
Meet the Author – Book Signing

Authors of books published in the last two years are invited to sign and sell their books at the conference during our “Meet the Author” session. There is no charge to participate!  Bring a display copy of your book and order forms for delegates to fill out, or contact your publisher and ask them to send books for sale.  Please complete the short form here to participate.